Saturday, July 04, 2015

In remembrance of Gregory"Mac" MacDonald,   Bravo Company,  4th Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, at 29, the "old man" of Bravo, a scholar with a degree in philosophy, graduate training in Near East Studies, killed in action  06/25/2003 near  Hilla, Iraq.

Friday, May 29, 2015

2LAR New York Fleet Week

Marines take over Times Square

Marines from 2nd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion showcase a Light Armored Vehicle in Times Square during Fleet Week New York, May 22, 2015, New York City. Fleet Week has been held nearly every year since 1984 and is the city’s celebration of sea services. It provides citizens of New York City and the surrounding tri-state area the opportunity to meet and interact with Marines, sailors and Coast Guardsmen, as well as see the capabilities of today’s maritime services. LCpl. Calvin Shamoon photo

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

4th LAR Readiness

Army National Training Center Fort Irwin, California -- By Sgt. Justis Beauregard | | July 18, 2014
 The Marine Corps is a force in readiness. The 4th Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion proved their readiness during their annual training here, 6 - 20 July, 2014. 
This year’s annual training brought the entire battalion to the Mojave Desert to conduct exercises such as weapons training, live fire ranges and demolition. The training allowed the battalion to incorporate basic skills developed in previous deployments.
This was the first time since the battalion’s deployment to Afghanistan in 2009 – 2010 that all the companies, with the exception of  Company A, were able to train together.  
“This training is vital for staff that don’t typically get the chance to command and control,” said Lt. Col. Lance Ferrell, the commanding officer of 4th LAR. “It is huge for companies to work together and operate on a larger scale.”
As Reserve units, the companies within 4th LAR only meet once a month and two full weeks a year. The companies are spread all around the country in places like Salt Lake City, Utah, Syracuse, New York and Camp Pendleton, California. While the companies work together on their drill weekends, they rarely get to work together as a battalion.
“Most Marines know their entire companies, but this training allows them to work with Marines from other companies that they don’t know,” said Sgt. Maj. Michael Pritchard, inspector-instructor sergeant major of 4th LAR. “Being able to integrate will allow the Marines to do their jobs when they deploy, no matter who they work with.”
The training at Fort Irwin was not only valuable for combat, but for logistics and communications, explained Ferrell. The battalion had to establish communications throughout the mountains that separated the ranges on Fort Irwin.
“The large training area was an obstacle for logistics and communications but valuable training for the light armored vehicles,” said Pritchard. “Fort Irwin gives the LAVs unrestricted training and more movement capabilities than other bases.”
The large training area gave the Marines a chance to use all of the weaponry available on the LAVs and the chance to use the Mine Clearing Lane Charge. Additionally, the Marines had a chance to fire the M242 Bushmaster chain gun, the M240 machine gun and anti-tank guided missiles. Marines also fired a MICLIC, which consists of a rocket tethered to thousands of pounds of C-4 explosives from an LAV. The MICLIC clears out mines and any obstacles, and gives the LAVs a safe and clear path to travel through. The Marines also fired a man-portable MICLIC that consists of two backpacks that fire a smaller rocket with tethered grenades that makes a safe path for Marines.  In addition to the firepower on the LAVs, the scouts had a chance to engage the enemy in live-fire exercises with the M4 Service Rifle, M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle and M136 AT4 Rocket Launcher. 
The large training exercise gave the battalion a chance to evaluate the companies on mission essential tasks, explained Ferrell.
All of the company’s exercises were carefully evaluated. In addition to the experience the Marines received, the battalion learned the companies’ capabilities.
“This is a great learning opportunity for myself and the rest of the Marines out here,” said Cpl. Christian Orosco, a vehicle commander with Company A, 4th LAR. “Hopefully, the Marines will go back to their companies and build training packages from what they learned here.”
The annual training concluded with the final exercise that incorporated the capabilities of all the companies as they would be utilized should the battalion deploy to combat again.
The company’s abilities were tested and the final exercise tested the battalion’s ability to command and control, explained Lt. Col. Robb A. Sucher, the inspector-instructor of 4th LAR. The goal is to make the battalion ready to deploy with what we learn from the final exer

Army National Training Center Fort Irwin, California -- 
 The Marine Corps is a force in readiness. The 4th Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion proved their readiness during their annual training here, 6 - 20 July, 2014. 
This year’s annual training brought the entire battalion to the Mojave Desert to conduct exercises such as weapons training, live fire ranges and demolition. The training allowed the battalion to incorporate basic skills developed in previous deployments.
This was the first time since the battalion’s deployment to Afghanistan in 2009 – 2010 that all the companies, with the exception of  Company A, were able to train together.  
“This training is vital for staff that don’t typically get the chance to command and control,” said Lt. Col. Lance Ferrell, the commanding officer of 4th LAR. “It is huge for companies to work together and operate on a larger scale.”
As Reserve units, the companies within 4th LAR only meet once a month and two full weeks a year. The companies are spread all around the country in places like Salt Lake City, Utah, Syracuse, New York and Camp Pendleton, California. While the companies work together on their drill weekends, they rarely get to work together as a battalion.
“Most Marines know their entire companies, but this training allows them to work with Marines from other companies that they don’t know,” said Sgt. Maj. Michael Pritchard, inspector-instructor sergeant major of 4th LAR. “Being able to integrate will allow the Marines to do their jobs when they deploy, no matter who they work with.”
The training at Fort Irwin was not only valuable for combat, but for logistics and communications, explained Ferrell. The battalion had to establish communications throughout the mountains that separated the ranges on Fort Irwin.
“The large training area was an obstacle for logistics and communications but valuable training for the light armored vehicles,” said Pritchard. “Fort Irwin gives the LAVs unrestricted training and more movement capabilities than other bases.”
The large training area gave the Marines a chance to use all of the weaponry available on the LAVs and the chance to use the Mine Clearing Lane Charge. Additionally, the Marines had a chance to fire the M242 Bushmaster chain gun, the M240 machine gun and anti-tank guided missiles. Marines also fired a MICLIC, which consists of a rocket tethered to thousands of pounds of C-4 explosives from an LAV. The MICLIC clears out mines and any obstacles, and gives the LAVs a safe and clear path to travel through. The Marines also fired a man-portable MICLIC that consists of two backpacks that fire a smaller rocket with tethered grenades that makes a safe path for Marines.  In addition to the firepower on the LAVs, the scouts had a chance to engage the enemy in live-fire exercises with the M4 Service Rifle, M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle and M136 AT4 Rocket Launcher. 
The large training exercise gave the battalion a chance to evaluate the companies on mission essential tasks, explained Ferrell.
All of the company’s exercises were carefully evaluated. In addition to the experience the Marines received, the battalion learned the companies’ capabilities.
“This is a great learning opportunity for myself and the rest of the Marines out here,” said Cpl. Christian Orosco, a vehicle commander with Company A, 4th LAR. “Hopefully, the Marines will go back to their companies and build training packages from what they learned here.”
The annual training concluded with the final exercise that incorporated the capabilities of all the companies as they would be utilized should the battalion deploy to combat again.
The company’s abilities were tested and the final exercise tested the battalion’s ability to command and control, explained Lt. Col. Robb A. Sucher, the inspector-instructor of 4th LAR. The goal is to make the battalion ready to deploy with what we learn from the final exercise.
“I will know the strengths and weaknesses of every company,” said Ferrell. “I can tell the commanding general [of 4th Marine Division] we are ready. We are at our highest point of readiness.”

Monday, May 12, 2014

Sgt. Hall, FDC Chief, live fire exercises

Sgt. Hall, Company FDC Chief on training in support of live fire exercises, April, 2014, at Fort Pickett, VA.  

Cpl. Cuevas, Bravo 4th LAR

Cpl. Cuevas, Bravo 4th LAR on task spotting targets with
binos April 2014, Fort Picket, VA
photo thanks 4th LAR FSTT

Captain Takahashi, Echo Company XO

Capt. Takahashi, Company XO provides the close air support for the scouts and FIST aboard the Csquare during April 2014 Fist Training at Syracuse NY
photo credit: 4th LAR newsletter Fire Support Training Team

Sgts Keyon and Lalone w/ LCpl. Pafundi FIST Training

SSgts Kenyon and Lalone along with LCpl. Pafundi, Echo Co. Syracuse, NY. as Mortar Section Leader, FDC Chief and Company FO on task of map recon prep for FIST Training April 2014. Photo courtesy CWO S. Rose

Friday, May 02, 2014

LCPL Kevin Cruz-Vasquez, Delta 2LAR

LCpl Cruz-Vasquez checks out the impact of the rounds fired by his compadres  training on the  M107 .50 Caliber Special M1Application Scoped Rifle photo Lance Cpl. Krista James

UnIdentified 3LAR Marines On Huff and Puff Exercise Wolfpack Challenge

Unidentified Marines, probably from Any Town,  USA,  where the ubiquitious MREs are produced, lug a
log and tire at the Del Valle Field Wolf Pack Warrior Challenge 29 Stumps, CA 

Thursday, April 10, 2014

LanceCPL Frank M. Garrison III C Co. 2LAR

Lance Cpl. Frank M. Garrison III, a Shinnston, rifleman with Company C, 2nd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion,  provides security as the Afghan Border Police  with Marines move through WAZIRABAD, Helmand province, 06/27/2011
Photo Cpl.  Jeff Drew

Tuesday, April 08, 2014

Sgt. Christopher Holmstrom, 2LAR,PATROL BASE WOLFPACK, HELMAND PROVINCE, 10.21.2011

Sgt. Christopher Holmstrom  Light Armored Vehicle mechanic with 2nd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion on his third deployment -- his second in Afghanistan --  five years after joining in January 2007.
Photo credit Cpl. Marci Mancha

LCPL. William S. Gamble, Helman Province, 2010

Lance Cpl. William S. Gamble, scout, Alpha Company, 2nd LAR,  searches the interior of a vehicle at a vehicle checkpoint in the desert of Helmand province, Afghanistan, May 16, 2010.  Second platoon, Alpha Company, 2nd LAR Bn. maintained the check point for 36 days along Route Red providing security for convoy routes. Photo Benjamin Crilly, LCPL

Read more: http://www.dvidshub.net/image/281711/2nd-lar-brings-lasting-security-helmand-province#.U0Qbd15H2FI#ixzz2yJLCR4nG

Saturday, March 22, 2014

Cpl.Samuel Bowers Marine of the Quarter

 Cpl. Samuel Bowers  was named Marine of the Quarter, 2nd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion at Camp Lejeune, N.C., and Marine of the Quarter for the  2nd Marine Division

Monday, March 17, 2014

Lance Corporal Cullen L. OBrien

Lance Cpl. Cullen L. O’Brien preps a mortar round for live-fire training Feb. 11 at the Central Training Area near Camp Hansen. O’Brien is a light armored vehicle crewman currently assigned to LAR Co.
 Photo by Lance Cpl. Cedric R. Haller


Read more: http://www.dvidshub.net/image/1170572/marines-fire-lav-mounted-mortars#.Uybit9xH1lI#ixzz2wDioOJhD

Sgt. Hector Perez 3rd LAR

Sgt. Hector Perez, 30, from Hawthorne, Calif., and his wife, Breanna, are learning to cope with injuries he sustained while deployed to Afghanistan in 2011. Perez,  is now with Wounded Warrior Battalion West and was  with the 3rd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion riding in the lead vehicle on a route-clearing convoy when they struck an improvised explosive device. Photo LCPL Ashton Buckingham

Read more: http://www.dvidshub.net/image/1184194/hawthorne-marines-recovery-becomes-his-main-focus#.Uybg8dxH1lI#ixzz2wDhH63p1

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Legacy Brick Program Extended



Legacy Brick Program has been extended  for another month.  Marines and Corpsman of 2D LAV, LAI, LAR Bn. can purchase personalized bricks with or without select logos and up to 3 lines of lettering on each brick.  Smaller replica bricks are also available. 

 Legacy Bricks will be placed around the cement pad of Swamp Thing located at the 2D LAR Bn. HQ.  These bricks can be personal to Honor a specific Marine or Corpsman, or just to pay tribute to the battalion.  

Installation will be complete prior to the 30th Anniversary Celebration.  Legacy Bricks run  from $40.00 to $60.00 depending on your choice. 

Questions? Contact Scott atAdmin@Thedestroyerschapter.com.  This link will take you to the Memorial Enhancement page where the Legacy Brick Program is Explained.  

You can also print out a form from this page:  M.E.P. Legacy Brick Program.  Information can also be found along with photos of the first installation at https://www.facebook.com/TheDestroyersChapter?ref=hl.